9-16 October 2021: National Hate Crime Awareness Week

National Hate Crime Awareness Week takes place in October every year, and is an opportunity to raise awareness of what hate crime is and stand by those affected by it.

National Hate Crime Awareness Week encourages us to consider how we can respond to hate crime when we witness or are victims to it. This can help to ensure people report instances of hate crime, victims get the support they need and those committing it are met with justice.

Hate crime includes any criminal offence targeted at someone that is fuelled by hostility or prejudice related to the individual’s disability, race or ethnicity, religion or belief, sexual orientation or transgender identity.

Hate crime is particularly important to talk about on Holocaust Memorial Day, as we remember victims of genocide, a crime carried out on a group of people due to their identity. Hate crimes will always take place on the path to genocide as a precursor to the killings, as a means to dehumanise those who are deemed ‘different’.  Jews in Nazi Germany, for example, were the subject of offensive propaganda, labelled ‘vermin’ and had their businesses, homes and synagogues attacked on Kristallnacht in 1938. Disabled people, gay people and Roma and Sinti people were among other groups targeted by the Nazis.

See our HMD discrimination lesson plan, which teaches Key Stage 3, 4 or 5 learners about hate crime, antisemitism and anti-Muslim hatred.

The National Hate Crime Awareness week website explains how you can report hate crime and who to report it to. Alternatively, you can report antisemitism through CST or anti-Muslim incidents with TellMAMA.

The ten stages of genocide

The ten stages of genocide

Genocide never just happens. There is always a set of circumstances which occur or which are created to build the climate in which genocide can take place.

9 November 1938: Kristallnacht

9 November 1938: Kristallnacht

On 9 November 1938, the Nazis initiated a campaign of hatred against the Jewish population in all Nazi territories. An estimated 91 Jews were killed, 30,000 arrested and 267 synagogues destroyed. Many shops and other Jewish businesses were destroyed and looted.

Asma - Anti-Muslim hate

Asma - Anti-Muslim hate

In a video produced by Tell MAMA and Faith Matters, Asma shares her experience of suffering an incident of anti-Muslim hate and explains how she moved forward from this event.