International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia

Each year on 17 May, the UK and countries across the world mark the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT).

IDAHOTB is celebrated in 130 countries across the world.  It is celebrated on 17 May to mark the anniversary of the decision, in 1990, to remove homosexuality from the International Classification of Diseases published by the World Health Organisation.

Even today it is estimated that at least 81 UN Member States still criminalise same sex relationships.  Of these, 10 still consider the death penalty for same sex acts. For many sexual and gender minorities across the world, basic human rights are denied to them.

The early 20th century saw Berlin become a liberal city where lesbian and gay organisations, cafes, bars and events thrived. However, repression against gay men and lesbians began just days after Hitler became Chancellor. An estimated 10-15,000 men were deported to concentration camps, and many were castrated and subjected to medical experiments.

On Holocaust Memorial Day, we remember the gay and lesbian victims of the Nazis, alongside all victims of Nazi persecution. You can read more about those persecuted by the Nazis here.

Explore our other dates to remember

Nazi Persecution: Gay people

Nazi Persecution: Gay people

Lesbian and gay life in Germany began to thrive at the beginning of the 20th century. Berlin in particular was one of the most liberal cities in Europe with a number of lesbian and gay organisations, cafés, bars, publications and cultural events taking place.

Pierre Seel

Pierre Seel

Pierre Seel grew up in France, and was imprisoned by the Nazis for being gay at the age of 17. This life story explains how Pierre spoke out about his persecution.

Rudolf Brazda

Rudolf Brazda

Rudolf Brazda was the last known concentration camp survivor deported specifically for homosexuality. Twice imprisoned for homosexuality, he was deported to Buchenwald concentration camp in 1942 where he was subject to forced labour for 32 months.